todaysdocument:

Official Program for the March on Washington 

50 years ago on August 28, 1963, more than 250,000 demonstrators descended upon the nation’s capital to participate in the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” Not only was it the largest demonstration for human rights in United States history, but it also occasioned a rare display of unity among the various civil rights organizations. The event began with a rally at the Washington Monument featuring several celebrities and musicians. Participants then marched the mile-long National Mall to the Memorial. The three-hour long program at the Lincoln Memorial included speeches from prominent civil rights and religious leaders. The day ended with a meeting between the march leaders and President John F. Kennedy at the White House.

The idea for the 1963 March on Washington was envisioned by A. Philip Randolph, a long-time civil rights activist dedicated to improving the economic condition of black Americans. When Randolph first proposed the march in late 1962, he received little response from other civil rights leaders. He knew that cooperation would be difficult because each had his own agenda for the civil rights movement, and the leaders competed for funding and press coverage. Success of the March on Washington would depend on the involvement of the so-called “Big Six”—Randolph and the heads of the five major civil rights organizations: Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP); Whitney Young, Jr., of the National Urban League; Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); James Farmer of the Conference of Racial Equality (CORE); and John Lewis of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

The details and organization of the march were handled by Bayard Rustin, Randolph’s trusted associate. Rustin was a veteran activist with extensive experience in putting together mass protest. With only two months to plan, Rustin established his headquarters in Harlem, NY, with a smaller office in Washington. He and his core staff of 200 volunteers quickly put together the largest peaceful demonstration in U.S. history.

via Our Documents - Official Program for the March on Washington (1963)

The National Archives marks the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom with a featured display of an iconic image from the march, a special program and film screenings of THE MARCH, James Blue’s 1964 film that documents this event.


buzzfeed:

RIP English. 

…and I’m sure scholars were just as annoyed when people like Dickens and Twain were using “literally” improperly, because the original definition of “literally” is “an exact, word-for-word replication of text from one source to another.”  Definitions of words tend to morph over time, like they always have for centuries. So, what I’m literally trying to say is:  Get over it.

buzzfeed:

RIP English.

…and I’m sure scholars were just as annoyed when people like Dickens and Twain were using “literally” improperly, because the original definition of “literally” is “an exact, word-for-word replication of text from one source to another.” Definitions of words tend to morph over time, like they always have for centuries. So, what I’m literally trying to say is: Get over it.


themirrorblue:

So this made me laugh. A lot.

"Who’s… orange shoes there?"

"Gareth Bale."

"Gareth Bale. Where’s he from? He from England?"

"Wales."

Wales? Wait… that’s another country?”

"Yes and no."

How many countries are in this country?!”

"Four."

No playoffs and you can tie. Why do y’all even bother?


Michael Scott: Attention, everyone. Hello. Yes, I just want you to know that, this is not my decision, but from here on out, we can no longer be friends. And when we talk about things here, we must only discuss work-associated things. And you can consider this my retirement from comedy. And in the future, if I want to say something funny, or witty, or do an impression, I will no longer ever do any of those things.
Jim Halpert: Does that include “that’s what she said?”

Michael Scott: Mm-hmm. Yes.

Jim Halpert: Wow, that is really hard. You really think you can go all day long? Well, you always left me satisfied and smiling, so…

Michael Scott: That’s what she said!